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File #: 12-1134    Version: Name: 8/20/12 - Direct Preparation for Ordinance to Repeal Percent for Art
Type: Resolution Status: Defeated
File created: 8/20/2012 In control: City Council
On agenda: 8/20/2012 Final action: 8/20/2012
Enactment date: 8/20/2012 Enactment #:
Title: Resolution to Direct Preparation for Consideration by City Council an Ordinance that Would Repeal the Percent for Art Program Beginning July 1, 2013
Sponsors: Jane Lumm
Title
Resolution to Direct Preparation for Consideration by City Council an Ordinance that Would Repeal the Percent for Art Program Beginning July 1, 2013
Memorandum
In November of 2007, City Council approved an ordinance that established the “percent for art” program which funds public art by diverting funds from approved capital projects whose source of funding includes tax millages for streets, parks, and solid waste as well as water and sewer system funds. The action was taken by City Council and not expressly authorized by the voters even though funds in some cases were being allocated for public art from voter-authorized, dedicated tax millages. Acknowledging that the sources of the public art funding technically serve the purposes of those dedicated funds, many citizens question the appropriateness of the use of these funds in this manner.

It is largely acknowledged that since its inception, the “percent for art” program has been both controversial and plagued by operational challenges. The primary questions and concerns that have generated the “percent for art” program controversy include:
· Utilizing taxpayer dollars and public funds for public art.
· Reduced funds for much-needed capital infrastructure projects.
· Concern expressed by many Ann Arbor residents who do not believe voter-authorized tax millage funds for specific purposes should be used for public art, because they believe it is inappropriate and an unrelated purpose.
· The slow launch of the program, accumulated, unused surpluses at a challenging fiscal time for the City, and projects not universally accepted.
· The fact that the decision was made by City Council, not the voters, in spite of its impact on spending from voter-approved millages.

The operational challenges facing the “percent for art” program are widely recognized, including the current program restrictions cited as the primary reasons that dedicated public art millage-funding could be more effective than the current fu...

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